PDP Lesson Plans

These PDP lesson plans were shared by teachers from across the country who have already been using the PDP in their own classrooms.

 

Starter Kit

SK-3: Engage in a Team Negotiation Activity

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to computer and Internet if using PDP Online
Starter Kit Student Workbook
Jar of jellybeans (or other small items) for each team
Paper and pencil
Outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate the negotiating skills needed when working on a team.

Introduction:

Begin the class by discussing the needs for special skills, such as negotiations, when working on a team. Present the team concept as a job standard in today’s workplace. Present steps for negotiating any issue and discuss with the class. Identify the differences between negotiating and individual discussions.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 10. Conduct the activity from the student workbook.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module SK3
Have students complete the worksheet, download it and send it back to instructor.

Summary and Closure:

Count the actual number of items in the jar and compare individual vs. team numbers to the actual. Which estimate(s) are closer to the actual? In most cases the team responses will be closer to the actual. Discuss with the class why the team responses are usually more accurate than an individual’s.

Assessment:

Evaluation will be based upon participation in the activity and monitored by checking documentation in students’ notebook.

Optional Activities:

Conduct the follow-up activity from the student workbook.

Invite a speaker from industry OR visit an industrial site to discuss/view the use of teams and team negotiations in the workplace. The in-class activity could take the form of a panel discussion using representatives from several related businesses.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module.

SK-5 –Describe Workplace Components

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to computer and Internet if using PDP Online
Starter Kit Student Workbook
Flip Chart Paper or Marker Board
Outcome: Students will be able to identify components of the workplace in their chosen career field.

Introduction:

Begin the class by showing videos on careers. Ask students to be aware of the many different careers being introduced through out the video. The Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes an occupational outlook handbook. Visit www.bls/gov/oco. Likewise a variety of resources are available online at websites such as: www.careerbuilder.com Using brain storming techniques, have students develop a list of potential job sites in the local and regional area. Using team negotiation skills from SK2, prioritize the group’s choice for a field trip. With the guidance of the instructor, contact the business and arrange a tour.

TIPS- Remind students about business etiquette. See if they will need money for lunch or breaks. Secure permission slips and medical information release form.

To allow business and industry to verify a large number of students on a tour, compose a letter containing verification of the business tour, including the names of participants. During the visit request a signature, then photocopy the letter and provide one for each student to place in her or her notebook.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 13.
Have students participate in the tour and complete the evaluation sheet on Pages 13 and

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module SK5
Have students participate in the tour and complete the evaluation from the worksheet.

Summary and Closure:

“In this lesson you participated in a tour and completed a series of questions from your observations of workplace components. In future PDP levels, you will learn more about careers in your chosen field and employment opportunities.”

Assessment:

Review answers to questions in Activity 1.

Base your evaluation on the completed tour. If possible include verification from the business & industry representative.

Optional Activities:

Students’ tasks in the assignment could be to contact a business by telephone and follow up by preparing a written confirmation letter to send to the business representative. Upon completion of the activity, write thank-you notes to business representatives, school administration, bus drivers, etc.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module.

To enhance students’ public relation skills, have them prepare news releases for the school or community and take photographs to create a scrapbook.

In a roundtable discussion, have students talk about their experiences. Select a leader and a recorder.

  1. Compare positive observations
  2. Compare negative observations
  3. Try to forecast the future of the job
  4. Suggest how “you” as a new employee would react to the job
  5. Identify common similarities observed at the workplace visited

Level 1

1.1 – Complete a Self-assessment and Identify Individual Learning Styles

PDP Lesson Plan

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 1 Student Workbook
Flip Chart Paper or Marker Board
Outcome: Students will be able to identify areas they can improve on to enable them to become a more self-aware worker and individual.

Introduction:

Begin the class by telling the students they will be completing a self-assessment survey and that it is a very personal assignment. Also tell them it is important to complete the assignment honestly and that no one else will see their responses.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 7 and complete the self-assessment on Page 8. NOTE: Key words or phrases may need to be defined for more accurate results. After surveys are completed, discuss them only in general terms.

Have students complete Activity 2 and Activity 3 on Pages 9 and 10. Ask students to think about the job(s) they may be doing at the present and ask them to honestly evaluate that job according to the responses they gave. Are there characteristics necessary for the job that you need to work on?

Ask students to read the introduction to Learning Styles on Page 11 and complete the Learning Style Survey on Page 12. Discuss with the students their recorded responses and how they may impact on their learning and their work.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 1.1.
Have students complete worksheets. After completion of worksheets, ask students to upload and send those to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

After viewing the results of your self-assessment inventory and learning style survey, the next step is to create a personal growth plan. After two months, we will revisit the same assessment/surveys, evaluate your progress and set new goals for growth.

Assessment:

Students will be evaluated based on completion of the self-assessment inventory sheets and a demonstration of improvement in self-designated weak areas.

Optional Activities:

Compile individual results from the Learning Styles Survey into a chart or graph depicting the learning styles of the class. Students may prepare the chart or graph using a computer. Use the graph as a visual reference when students plan learning activities so the activities will be appropriate for learning styles.

Have students complete the Personal Leadership Inventory on the SkillsUSA website. View the results and create a personal growth plan. After two months, revisit the same file and complete the inventory again. Evaluate your progress and set new goals for growth.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the two online collaboration activities in the module.

1.10 – Identify Components of an Employment Portfolio

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 1 Student Workbook
Flip Chart Paper or Marker Board
Outcome: Students will be able to identify components that could be included in a portfolio.

Introduction:

Begin the class by leading a role play with two applicants for a job: one with a portfolio and one without. As a group brainstorm for activities, awards, achievements, interests and special talents that could be included in a portfolio. Tip: Several portfolios on display might give the students an idea for their end product. If the students have not seen one, it may be difficult to visualize the possibilities.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Pages 55 and 56. Have students complete Activity 2 on Page 56.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 1.10.
Have students to complete Activity 2 Worksheets. After completion of worksheets ask students to upload and send those to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

“In this lesson you learned the importance of a portfolio, components that should be included in a portfolio and created a portfolio opener. In Level 2, you will begin the development of your portfolio.”

Assessment:

Review answers to questions in Activity 2 and portfolio opener.

Students may also be evaluated based on their participation within the group and identification of the components of a portfolio.

Optional Activities:

Have students research electronic portfolios on the Internet and select their favorite to design/structure to share with the class.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the two online collaboration activities in the module.

Level 2

2.3 – Select Characteristics of a Positive Self-Image

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer and Internet if using PDP Online
Level 2 Student Workbook
Flip Chart Paper or Marker Board
Outcome: Students will be able to identify characteristics the project a positive image.

Introduction:

Begin the class by having students brainstorm a list of positive and negative behaviors. Record their ideas on flip chart paper or white board. Compare the list to Activity 1 on Page 12 of the PDP Student Workbook.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 13.
Have students complete Activity 1 and 2 on Pages 13 and 15.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 2.3.
Ask students to complete Activity 1 and 2 worksheets. After completion of worksheets, ask students to upload and send those to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

“In this lesson you learned the characteristics of a positive image. In Level 2 you will demonstrate interviewing skills and creating a positive image.”

Assessment:

Review answers to questions in Activity 2. NOTE: numbers 4,5,6,8,10,11,12,14,15,16 should be checked.

Optional Activities:

Ask a guest speaker (image consultant, cosmetologist, business person, employment agency representative) to come to the class to talk about first impressions and image. Role play how you should and should not dress for a job. Use class discussion to reveal students’ attitudes toward characteristics of a positive image.

Using professional journals, have students select images portrayed by various models (classic, goth, punk, preppie, natural, conservative) and answer the following questions: What items contribute to each image? Describe hair makeup, nails and clothes. What type of image do you want to portray? Have them create collages using pictures they feel portray their image.

Visit a business and observe the images portrayed by the employees. Have students write a paper explaining what appealed to them and what did not.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the two online collaboration activities in the module.

2.6 –Apply team skills to a group project

Time:
Materials Needed: Access to Computer and Internet if using PDP Online
Starter Kit Student Workbook
Flip Chart Paper or Marker Board
Outcome: Students will be able to:

  • Observe team dynamics and draw conclusions about how teams operate.
  • Identify, record and discuss stages of team growth, while participating in a team experience.
Introduction:

Ask students the following questions: Have you ever experienced working in a group where things did not go smoothly? Have they ever been part of a group that seemed to just “click” together?

Explain to your students that teams are groups of people working together by pooling their skills, talents and knowledge to reach a common goal. Explain that teams are very important entities of any workplace today, and the more they know about team dynamics the more effective they can do the job.

Point out examples of teamwork that are taking place in the class/school/workplace at the present time. How are our students working together toward a common goal. Share the sequence of team growth stages to all participants and discuss whether anyone has experienced any of the outlined feelings.

Stage One – Forming: When a team is forming, members are making a transition from being an individual on a project to being a member of a group. They “test the boundaries of group behavior and also the leader’s role. Feelings of anticipation, excitement, suspicion, fear and anxiety can all be present in the forming state. Teams in the forming stage rarely achieve much as they are busy assessing the team’s parameters, leaving their “individual status.”

Stage Two – Storming: This stage earns its name. Teams go through a very difficult time when the project seems too complex. Progress is slow, members argue about approaches, and people resist collaborating. The storming stage includes feelings of resistance, negative attitude toward project success, competition, defensiveness and increased tension. Team members spend much of their energy during this stage in resistance and competition and not toward the team goal. However, team members are beginning to understand each other.

Stage Three – Norming: This stage represents acceptance of the team’s ground rules and members roles. The conflict found in storming is reduced and competition becomes more cooperative. Membership in a team is accepted, and input is now constructive. Norming stage includes avoiding conflict, sharing, a sense of team cohesion and a common spirit. Significant progress can now be made toward the team goal, as members realize that they can succeed.

Stage Four – Performing: The team now solves problems and implements changes. Team members accept each other’s strengths and weaknesses and are comfortable in their team roles. A feeling of satisfaction is evident, and members feel an attachment to the team. Work is getting done, and the team operates like a well-oiled machine.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 21.

Have students participate in the brainstorming activity on Page 21.

Have students complete Activity 2 on Page 22. While they plan and implement their project, have team members individually identify and record in a journal any team behaviors. Have students note any specific feelings or behaviors that represent particular growth stages.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 2.6

Have students complete the worksheet. After completion of worksheet ask students to upload and send it to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

Have students review the four stages of team growth. Challenge them by reading a set of behaviors and feelings that describe any of the stages, with them providing the stage name in response.

Assessment:

Review answers to questions in Activity 1.

Instructor will review all student work. Student will organize and take part in a group activity. The group activity project can be a community service project or an in-class project.

Optional Activities:

As a project team, have students share their recorded team behaviors to their teammates. As a large group, have individuals share examples of different behaviors from each of the four team growth stages.

As an independent activity, have each student assess his or her role as a team member throughout the planning and implementations of this project. Have students write a journal entry/short paper that addresses how they evolved through form/storm/norm/perform team stages. Ask them to think about what specific feelings and thoughts they had at each stage. Also, have students comment about the different team roles that were carried out. Was facilitating handled effectively?

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module.

2.16 – Assemble Your Employment Portfolio

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 2 Student Workbook
Outcome: Students will be able to effectively demonstrate the skill of “showcasing” their abilities and accomplishments through the development of a personal/professional portfolio.

Introduction:

Begin the class by introducing the concept of a portfolio. Conduct a discussion around the uses of a portfolio (e.g. job interviews/college interviews). Brainstorm format for portfolio OR teacher presents format for all to follow including arrangement (chronologically, by subject, etc).

Tip: Several portfolios on display might give the students an idea for their end product. If the students have not seen one, it may be difficult to visualize the possibilities.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Pages 66-70 and begin building a portfolio using the guidelines in the text.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 2.16.

Summary and Closure:

“In this lesson you learned the contents of a portfolio, the importance of a portfolio. Whether you decide to build a notebook portfolio or electronic portfolio, the components should be developed in such a way as can be easily updated.”

Identify timeline for portfolio development and updates.

Assessment:

Identify timeline for portfolio development and updates. Students will be evaluated according to the quality and organization of the materials suggested for the inclusion in the portfolio.

Optional Activities:

Each student will search the web for the occupation of his/her interest. Each will identify the entry-level requirements for that occupation and establish a plan to update their portfolio as they achieve each of the requirements (Technology Search). Each student will write a list of all entry-level requirements from their search and include it in their portfolio as a checklist.

Level 3

3.7 Research Résumé Writing

Time: One class period
PDP Lesson Plan
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 3 Student Workbook
Outcome: Students will be able to develop and critique a résumé to a human resource director’s specifications.

Introduction:

Give your students the following scenario:

You are in need of someone to handle your finances for a booming new company that you started. You are the founder and creator of “Dog Duds: Catchy Clothing for Canines.” Business is great. How might you go about finding a competent business manger? Talk with people? Place an ad? What information will you need to know about someone to check if they are qualified to be your business manger? How will you find this out?

Discuss the value résumés in this situation. Show students sample résumés making sure you delete names and addresses or other indentifying information.

Have students examine résumés and decide what they like/don’t like about them. Generate a group list of their ideas and discuss the pros and cons of layout style and content.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 33. Have students complete Activity 1 and Activity 2 on Page 33.

Assist students in developing their own résumé. Ask students to find another person to examine and proofread their résumé. Check for the following:

  • objective is clear
  • content is specific and represents author well
  • layout is effective
  • style is appealing, easy to ready
  • spelling and grammar are accurate

Have students consider the feedback and determine if any changes are necessary. Have students print a their résumé on the computer and place it in their portfolio.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 3.7.

Have students complete the worksheet. After completion of worksheet ask students to upload and send it to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

“In this lesson you learned the purpose of a résumé and key development areas: content, layout style, accuracy and delivery. It is important to update résumés as you gain new experiences, develop different career goals or advance to higher levels of work. ”

Assessment:

Evaluation will be based on thorough completion, accuracy and neatness of the résumé. A current copy of the résumé should be placed in the portfolio.

Optional Activities:

Have students develop a job search file (can be as simple as a manila folder) that contains copies of their résumé, a reference list with accurate contact information, and perhaps a business card outline or a picture. Also have them include any good career contacts they’ve made so far through their professional development.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module

3.10 Identify and Apply Conflict Resolution Skills

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 3 Student Workbook
Outcome: Students will be able to develop strategies for resolving conflict and apply them to their daily lives.

Introduction:

Ask students “What does conflict resolution mean to you?” Discuss.

Breakdown “conflict” (have students give examples of conflict in their lives) and “resolution.” Define each term. With your students, develop a set of strategies that they can use anytime they run into conflict. Participation, sharing ideas and willingness to test new strategies will be required of students.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 45. In small groups have students read the case studies and answer the questions in Activity 1. As a large group, have students use Activity 1 ideas to generate a list of some strategies to address conflict. Ask students to volunteer other techniques that they may already use. For example, “put yourself in other person’s shoes.”

In large groups have students discuss the possible roots of conflict such as miscommunication, differing values, opposing objectives, personality types. Have students elaborate on these “roots” from their own experiences. Emphasize that understanding roots of conflict help you to understand better how to address the issue(s).

Have students practice developing “I” vs. “you” messages in response to criticism. Remind them that “you” messages are an accusation of others or an attitude that places responsibility on others rather than one’s self. Have students revisit each scenario in Activity 1 and identify the root(s) of the conflict and how they could apply “I” messages when resolving each matter.

Have students complete Activity 2 on Page 47 and Activity 3 on Page 48.

Instructions for Online Version:
  • Ask students to complete online module 3.10.
  • Have students complete the worksheet. After completion of worksheet ask students to upload and send it to you for review.
Summary and Closure:

Revisit the objective and have students summarize conflict resolution strategies in their own words. Continue to reinforce their “testing” experiences.

Assessment:

Evaluation will be based on class participation, in-class discussion and group activity and assignment.

Optional Activities:

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module

Level 4

4.1 Predict Employment Trends

Time: One class period
PDP Lesson Plan
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 4 Student Workbook
Outcome: Students will be able to identify employment trends and risks of employment changes in their area of study.

Introduction:

Introduce concept of employment trends using the specific area of study as an example.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 7 and complete Activity 1 by researching using journals, magazines, newspapers and web.

As a class, complete Activity 2 and answer questions in Activity 3.

Complete Activity 4 as an individual assignment. Create chart using the data collected by each student. Through a class discussion, have students identify the best options for them based upon the data collected. Note: Answers to these questions are individual and may vary.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 4.1.

Have students complete the worksheet. After completion of worksheet ask students to upload and send it to you for review.
Summary and Closure:

Create chart using the data collected by each student from Activity 4. Through a class discussion, have students identify the best options for them based upon the data collected. Note: Answers to these questions are individual and may vary.

Assessment:

Evaluation will be based on effectiveness of research project, proper documentation and accuracy of charts and graphs. If appropriate, include these items in portfolio.

Optional Activities:

Graph the findings from the research using appropriate software.

Conduct a panel discussion involving one or more economics instructors, business leaders and chamber representatives to discuss local employment trends, their effect on the local, state and national economy and risks of employment changes.

If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module

4.3 Examine Ethics and Values in the Workplace

Time: One class period
Materials Needed: Access to Computer
Level 4 Student Workbook
Outcome: Students will be able to interpret work-related situations and communicate (written or verbal) ethical responses.

Introduction:

Discuss, in class, the concept of ethics and its role in the workplace. Introduce the term “whistle blower” and discuss examples.

Instructions for Paper Version:

Ask students to read the introduction on Page 13 and complete Activity 1 and Activity 3 as individuals.

Divide class into teams of approximately 5-6. Assign each team to research high profile ethics cases (see examples in Activity 4.) Ask teams to formulate an opinion of the issue identified and be prepared to defend or debate.

Instructions for Online Version:

Ask students to complete online module 4.3. Have students complete the worksheet. After completion of the worksheet, ask students to upload it and send it to you for review.

Summary and Closure:

Identify one member of each team to present the team’s findings from Activity 4. Have the full team serve as a panel about the situation for the class to question. Each panel member will be prepared to defend the team findings and the impact on the individual involved and the workplace.

Assessment:

Evaluation will be based on class participation, in-class discussion, and group activity and assignment.

Optional Activities:
  • Assign each team to create a scenario that depicts unethical behavior. Role place the scenario for the class. Initiate class discussion on recommendations for correcting behavior
  • If using the online version, ask students to participate in the online collaboration activities in the module